W3C publishes early draft of HTML 5

By   |  January 24, 2008

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has published a working draft for the next version of universal internet markup language, HTML 5, ten years after its last major version.

The international web standards body said that HTML 5 would be a major revision, adding several changes to HTML 4, which was first published in December 1997.

Using HTML 5, pages can be constructed using both classic HTML syntax and XML syntax. Some of the new features include application programming interfaces (APIs) for drawing two-dimensional graphics, embedding and controlling audio and video content, maintaining persistent client-side data storage, and for enabling users to edit documents and parts of documents interactively.

“HTML is of course a very important standard,” said Tim Berners-Lee, author of the first version of HTML and W3C Director. “I am glad to see that the community of developers, including browser vendors, is working together to create the best possible path for the Web. To integrate the input of so many people is hard work, as is the challenge of balancing stability with innovation, pragmatism with idealism.”

Follow these links to see the full draft and a summary of changes to HTML 4.

Tags:

Comments

One Response to “W3C publishes early draft of HTML 5”

  1. Barry
    January 28th, 2008 @ 5:37 am

    This sounds all very exciting. The only question is when will we have browsers capable of displaying html5? And more to the point, will they all behave the same or will SOME browsers (IE, I’m looking at you) “interpret” the spec completely differently?

    And how long until there is a critical mass of users with browsers capable of rendering html5?

    What happened to xhtml?

Comments are closed