Ubuntu's Karmic Koala: What you can expect

By   |  February 21, 2009

With Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope just two months away from release, Mark Shuttleworth has dished the dirt on Jaunty’s successor: Karmic Koala. Shuttleworth says the Koala will take Ubuntu even further into the cloud with Amazon’s EC2 cloud service and UCSB’s Eucalyptus software while giving desktop users a completely new interface to enjoy.

With Karmic Koala scheduled to be released in October this year, Shuttleworth is no doubt aware (as readers have pointed out) that it is the release that will likely be compared to Microsoft’s Windows 7, also due out in late 2009 or early 2010. With that in mind, Karmic has two very distinct releases planned for both the desktop and the server.

Server
Shuttleworth said that “Ubuntu aims to keep free software at the forefront of cloud computing by embracing the APIs of Amazon EC2, and making it easy for anybody to setup their own cloud using entirely open tools … During the Karmic cycle we want to make it easy to deploy applications into the cloud, with ready-to-run appliances or by quickly assembling a custom image.”

Ubuntu Karma will also integrate UCSB’s Eucalyptus software which is designed to make it easy for users to create EC2-style clouds in their own datacentres. “It’s no coincidence that Eucalyptus has just been uploaded to universe and will be part of Jaunty – during the Karmic cycle we expect to make those clouds dance, with dynamically growing and shrinking resource allocations depending on your needs,” said Shuttleworth. Power usage will also be in the firing line with Karmic.

Desktop
On the desktop the Ubuntu team is promising many things, from even faster boot times to an overhauled desktop. “First impressions count,” said Shuttleworth. “We’re eagerly following the development of kernel mode setting, which promises a smooth and flicker-free startup. We’ll consider options like Red Hat’s Plymouth, for graphical boot on all the cards that support it.”

As far as boot times go, Shuttleworth said that with 25 seconds as a goal for Jaunty on netbooks, the aim is to lower that with the Karmic Koala.

And for netbooks, the goal is also to make sure Ubuntu’s Netbook Remix interface is easier to install and works as best as it can on all hardware. “For those of you who can relate to Mini Me, or already have a Dell Mini, the Ubuntu Netbook Edition will be updated to include all the latest technology from Moblin, and tuned to work even better on screens that are vertically challenged.”

Finally, Karmic’s desktop will get a new design overhaul. “The desktop will have a designer’s fingerprints all over it – we’re now beginning the serious push to a new look. Brown has served us well but the Koala is considering other options,” said Shuttleworth.

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Comments

30 Responses to “Ubuntu's Karmic Koala: What you can expect”

  1. Wogan
    February 21st, 2009 @ 8:15 pm

    Brown hasn’t really served you well at all, if you consider the color choices made by the marketshare-leading OSes.

    Look, get me Ubuntu with an integrated WINE layer that’s as flawless as Windows itself (especially for games), instant compatibility with all my devices, hassle-free email and antivirus, a UI that makes sense to navigate, and the ability to install software from a human-friendly interface that doesn’t need apt-get, let alone a console, and I’ll consider switching.

    Also, be absolutely sure I can get professional assistance when I need it, that your support forums, sites and blogs are well-indexed by Google, that your offline help files make sense (instead of just referring to equally perplexing websites), but most of all, make sure that I need absolutely no support in setting up my OS.

    I’d also be happy if you’d let me make my own choices relating to the theme and layout of the system, if you’d give me screensavers that look professional (small touch, but it counts), if you’d do things like map the Windows key on my keyboard to launch the Programs menu, if you’d make sure that proprietary media formats don’t require any consolediving to enable, if you’d let me turn off the “advanced effects” to increase speed.

    And it’d be great if I could choose to install Office 2007, Internet Explorer 8, Windows Media Player, or any other piece of Microsoft software, since I’ve paid for it, the rest of the world uses it, and I’m not going to sacrifice my way of life and work simply to switch OSes.

    Finally, give me three good reasons why I should backup and reformat my entire PC, erasing an OS I have a lifetime license to, install a new OS that’s confusing and ugly at first, spend endless nights trying to get all my old documents, pictures, music and movies back into a usable state, and possibly have to deal with rude and/or inexperienced “voluntary support staff” on your IRC channels just to get back up and running.

    Do all of that for me, Shuttleworth, and I’ll gladly dump Vista.

  2. Marco Valente
    February 21st, 2009 @ 9:58 pm

    Shuttleworth’s choice of names always seem to amuse me! I have got to say the coolest so far has been Intrepid Ibex, it has a ‘coolness’ appeal to it. Other than the horrid brown (which is priority number one to change, after every upgrade) I think Ubuntu is an awesome operating system, incredibly stable and very forgiving.

  3. Brady Merriweather
    February 22nd, 2009 @ 6:17 am

    Also, be absolutely sure I can get professional assistance when I need it, that your support forums, sites and blogs are well-indexed by Google, that your offline help files make sense (instead of just referring to equally perplexing websites), but most of all, make sure that I need absolutely no support in setting up my OS.

    You want professional assistance, Ubuntu has paid support if you wish to get direct phone help, instead of thumbing the forums.
    http://www.ubuntu.com/support/paid

    “I’d also be happy if you’d let me make my own choices relating to the theme and layout of the system, if you’d give me screensavers that look professional (small touch, but it counts), if you’d do things like map the Windows key on my keyboard to launch the Programs menu, if you’d make sure that proprietary media formats don’t require any consolediving to enable, if you’d let me turn off the “advanced effects” to increase speed.”

    You can change you theme. it is just a drag and drop of downloaded themes, or modify them from System > Preferences > Appearance.

    Advanced effects are not installed by default, but from System > Preferences> Appearance> & the Desktop Effects tab, just click disabled with a click, and you are done.

    “And it’d be great if I could choose to install Office 2007, Internet Explorer 8, Windows Media Player, or any other piece of Microsoft software, since I’ve paid for it, the rest of the world uses it, and I’m not going to sacrifice my way of life and work simply to switch OSes.”

    You got some good ideas, you know you can share them and have them considered for the next release at: http://brainstorm.ubuntu.com/

    Finally, give me three good reasons why I should backup and reformat my entire PC, erasing an OS I have a lifetime license to, install a new OS that’s confusing and ugly at first, spend endless nights trying to get all my old documents, pictures, music and movies back into a usable state, and possibly have to deal with rude and/or inexperienced “voluntary support staff” on your IRC channels just to get back up and running.

    Ubuntu has a migration wizard which moves your wallpaper, documents, and bookmarks to Ubuntu when you install. The main reason to switch, knowing that you might not be able to move your current music files to your new install of Windows 7 & having to repurchase all your DRM music again, you could be saving hundreds of dollars in re-purchases, replacing hardware such as your scanner , printer, or other devices that use standard cross OS support. Now since HP, Dell, Sun, & IBM support and certify the OS, there other products they produce may soon have support. Most.. I say MOST will be supported, not all of it.

  4. Alastair Otter
    February 22nd, 2009 @ 7:22 am

    @Wogan:

    There are so many sweeping generalisations that it makes it hard to know exactly what your problem with Ubuntu is.

    You say you want hassle-free email? Evolution, Thunderbird are so simple to use you’d have to be an amateur to find them a problem.

    Anti-virus? Linux doesn’t need one of those.

    And a human-friendly software install tool. You obviously haven’t tried synaptic, GDebi or the Update Manager. Not a console in sight. Yes, they mostly use apt-get (which is in fact a benefit) but you wouldn’t need to know that as a normal user.

    As far as support goes, again you fall into vague generalisation. There is an infinite amount of help available through the Ubuntu forums and a search on Google will turn up multiple answers to just about every question you might have. And as Brady points out you can also get paid support.

    You want to make your own choices with regards the theme and layout of the system? I assume, of course, you get that on Vista? Nevermind.

    On Ubuntu you can change everything from the icon set used to the window bars to even the desktop manager. I don’t recall a choice of desktop managers ever being a benefit of Windows.

    Instead of running Ubuntu down for not supporting Microsoft software perhaps you should rather ask Microsoft to make versions of Office, IE8 and its other software available for Linux. Suggesting that it is the fault of Ubuntu that Office doesn’t run on Linux is just plain ignorant.

    So you have a lifetime licence for Vista? Well, I have a lifetime licence for Ubuntu. The only difference is that my licence includes free access to future releases, the freedom to give copies away if I want to, and the freedom to rewrite the system if I am clever enough. When Windows 7 comes out I assume you will be buying a lifetime licence for it as well?

  5. wh
    February 22nd, 2009 @ 5:07 pm

    @Wogan

    * Why on earth would you want to install and run “Office 2007, Internet Explorer 8, Windows Media Player, or any other piece of Microsoft software” on a GNU/Linux desktop? Do you even understand what you’re saying?

    * The point of switching to a GNU/Linux system (there are other way more compeling reasons, of course), is that you don’t have to pay for software. But you still can, if you want to.

    * It’s all about choice, you chose (choose?) to fill MS’s coffers.

    * “Do all of that for me, Shuttleworth, and I’ll gladly dump Vista.” A little arrogant, I’d say. Millions of people have already dumped MS. Stop feeling sorry for yourself and get with it.

  6. Wogan
    February 22nd, 2009 @ 6:26 pm

    I suppose I should clarify a few things before I move on to responding to all your responses:

    1. I’m no Linux ignoramus. I’ve happily used Ubuntu in the past – in fact, I’ve switched back and forth so many times it’s beginning to come naturally to me.

    2. I know how to use a console. I run 2 VPSes that don’t have pretty GUIs, and yes, they’re both running Debian/BASH.

    3. I’m speaking from the perspective of the hundreds of millions of Average Home Users – ie, the numbers that make up the most of Microsoft’s 88.2% marketshare: http://href.co.za/1fe

    @wh

    1. I would want to install Office 2007 because that’s what the rest of my workplace uses (as I said in my initial comment). Openoffice’s support for MS formats is patchy at best, utterly unusable at worst. Don’t try the whole “But It’s All XML!” thing, believe me, I have tried and tried again to get documents to look the same. I would want IE8 to test sites in (I’m a web developer), and WMP just for kicks.

    And you’re right – millions have dumped MS. Most of them are running Macs now: http://href.co.za/1fe

    @Alastair Otter

    1. Evolution is NOT hassle-free. It’s the equivalent of Outlook, aka, OVERKILL, if all you want is to send emails every now and then.

    2. The point I made about antiviruses (Linux does need them, btw) was just an extension of the AHU argument. If an AHU wants to switch to Linux, one of the first questions they’ll ask is “What about Antivirus?”. Just because viruses on Linux aren’t common now doesn’t mean they won’t be, in a few years.

    3. I’ve used Synaptic (both GUI and Console), GDebi, everything graphical offered. It’s a confusing interface, especially if you’re looking for something that isn’t labelled or described in a way you would describe it. As an AHU I’d end up going out to buy software instead (and then get pisse because it won’t install on Linux).

    4. It’s a known fact that the majority of the MS userbase (who you’d want to convert to Linux users) use call-in support. If they didn’t, MS would probably be saving millions in salaries on call centre staff. How many Linux support call centers do you know of, with people trained to answer tricky questions?

    Yes, ubuntuforums.org and its sisters are indexed and searchable, but if everyone used that for support, we would have far less tech problems in the world, wouldn’t you agree?

    5. The thing about Microsoft is that they’ve been making user-friendly operating systems longer than anyone else. Seriously, look it up. UAC was the only major WTF in Vista – other than that, there’s no need to tinker with it to get it to look like something you’d want to use.

    Can’t say the same for Ubuntu’s brown, or the squinty Nautilus bars. And why would you want to change the desktop manager? Just having thousands of choices doesn’t automatically make the system better – it just gives you thousands of choices that are no better than the other. If that weren’t true, you’d only have 1 choice: The best one.

    6. Yes, it is Ubuntu’s fault that Office doesn’t run on Linux. Microsoft has nothing to gain by porting Office to Linux, but if the AHU can install Office on a Linux box, they’d be that much more sympathetic to switching. Which is supposed to be whole thing about Linux in the first place – getting people to switch.

    So since Ubuntu has more to gain out of Microsoft than this, why hasn’t Canonical done anything about it?

    7. You’ll only get free releases as long as Canonical’s around. And right now, they aint got much of a business model. How many copies of Ubuntu have you given away? And why on earth would one person want to tackle the problem of rewriting an operating system it took a team of people many years to produce?

    Up until now, all that Canonical’s really been doing is making Ubuntu faster and prettier and more demanding on hardware (basically treating it as a basement project), but they’ve got this whole “We’re gonna take over the desktop world” thing going. Which is great – except now, you need to do something about it.

    The questions/comments I left in my first comment are not unlike the questions and comments a normal Microsoft user would pose when asked if he/she wanted to switch. So far, all your answers have pointed towards systems and programs which are too confusing/inconvenient for normal Microsoft users – if they weren’t, we wouldn’t be having this discussion.

  7. michael
    February 22nd, 2009 @ 10:12 pm

    @Wogan:

    For the sake of my sanity I’m going to assume that your comment was a piece of well-crafted flamebait – I see no other plausible explanation for such ill-informed FUD.

    Get over yourself and step outside of your little bubble.

  8. Vadim P.
    February 23rd, 2009 @ 5:05 am

    @Wogan: Sorry, but the dream OS you’d like probably won’t come free. Expecting all of that for zero cost for you is… too much.

  9. Wogan
    February 23rd, 2009 @ 7:33 am

    @michael Flamebait? That’s exactly what it is. I’ve said it twice now and I’ll say it again – these are the questions most of the MS userbase will raise, and if you want to convert them, you’re going to have to be able to answer them.

    @Vadim Exactly – that’s why I’m paying for an OS now, because there isn’t a viable opensource alternative elsewhere. I don’t want to be restricted in terms of what I’m allowed to do with my OS, but I also don’t want to sit with a system I want to argue with instead of just use.

  10. michael
    February 23rd, 2009 @ 9:35 am

    >> 1. Evolution is NOT hassle-free. It’s the equivalent of Outlook, aka, OVERKILL, if all you want is to send emails every now and then.

    Thunderbird? Pine?

    >> 2. Just because viruses on Linux aren’t common now doesn’t mean they won’t be, in a few years.

    The difference being that most OS’s outside of Windows implement sane security models; and since Ubuntu by default installs binaries outside of your home directory, any “virus” infection would not be able to spread in any meaningful way whatsoever. Furthermore, on the off-chance that there is a major vulnerability that gets exploited, the source-code is instantly available for review by thousands of experts world-wide – instead of the usual Microsoft deny-all policy, slip out a fix 7 months down the line.

    >> 4. It’s a known fact that the majority of the MS userbase (who you’d want to convert to Linux users) use call-in support. If they didn’t, MS would probably be saving millions in salaries on call centre staff. How many Linux support call centers do you know of, with people trained to answer tricky questions?

    Well known fact to who? References? I think you mean that users use their local branded call-centres, e.g. Dell’s help-desk… which is distinctly not a Microsoft value-added service (and also not free). This is _exactly_ what Canonical’s help-desk is for.

    http://www.ubuntu.com/support/paid – $250/year

    >> 5. The thing about Microsoft is that they’ve been making user-friendly operating systems longer than anyone else. Seriously, look it up. UAC was the only major WTF in Vista – other than that, there’s no need to tinker with it to get it to look like something you’d want to use.

    Vista looks nothing like something I’d want to use – don’t confuse personal preference for widgets and shininess with usability. I have installed Ubuntu for several users who find Windows completely confusing (“newbies” in every sense of the word) – and they have yet to find a problem with it.

    >> 6. Yes, it is Ubuntu’s fault that Office doesn’t run on Linux. Microsoft has nothing to gain by porting Office to Linux, but if the AHU can install Office on a Linux box, they’d be that much more sympathetic to switching. Which is supposed to be whole thing about Linux in the first place – getting people to switch.

    Why would Canonical want to tie themselves to a non-FOSS piece of software – this goes against their very principles.

    >> 7. You’ll only get free releases as long as Canonical’s around. And right now, they aint got much of a business model. How many copies of Ubuntu have you given away? And why on earth would one person want to tackle the problem of rewriting an operating system it took a team of people many years to produce?

    7. You’ll only get licenses as long as Microsoft’s around. And right now, they aint got much of a business model. How many copies of Windows have you given away? And why on earth would one person want to tackle the problem of rewriting an operating system it took a team of people many years to produce?

    The difference is when Canonical disappears, the source-code for Ubuntu will still be here for any interested team to pick up and continue.

  11. wh
    February 23rd, 2009 @ 9:43 am

    @Wogan

    OK, this is now at the risk of becoming a flame war…

    Ever heard of standards? You won’t have to worry about interoperability between office apps and net apps if you use them, surely?

    http://href.co.za/1fe If GNU/Linux has a net app market share < 1%, why do you even bother? For that minute share, MS certainly goes out of their way to create a lot of FUD about Linux, Mr Balmer even calls it a cancer, but perhaps they know the true market share of Linux, or maybe they’re just insecure. The people at Adobe must have other figures too, they think it is worth it to develop Air for Linux…

  12. Wogan
    February 23rd, 2009 @ 1:54 pm

    Standards? lol. Yes, I’ve heard of them, yes, MS has promised to work towards them, and yes, the 2007 docX format is completely in line with standards. They started using XML to store information, instead of their own proprietary whatnot.

    Unfortunately, most of the world, (from what I’ve seen) still uses legacy Office 2003, Windows XP, and all those technologies suffering from outdated thinking. This translates directly into the need to be able to open and save .xls and .doc files, which (thanks to MS’ own doing) doesn’t work too well in opensource suites like OpenOffice.

    Linux does have a tiny desktop share, and I’m sure that MS isn’t worried about it. However, Linux has a massive server marketshare, and all the FUD that MS has been generating about it has mostly been aimed at the Linux Server market.

    Setting up Debian 4.0 with Apache, PHP and MySQL, for instance, takes a few minutes and costs nothing. Getting Windows Server, or IIS? It’s expensive in comparison, takes great technical skill to set up and run, and offers functionality not unlike what you can get for free (from Linux) nowadays.

    Hence, the MS flame war aganist Linux, because it’s a direct and palpable threat to their Server marketshare. Not their desktop share.

    As for Adobe AIR, I’m sure they only ported it to Linux because the technology is supposed to be “cross-platform”, and Linux is a platform. And since Adobe isn’t making any money directly off AIR, I doubt that profitability was a consideration.

  13. wh
    February 23rd, 2009 @ 4:07 pm

    @Wogan

    So basically, what you want (need?) is Microsoft Apps on a GNU/Linux desktop, right?

    I suppose you should just wait for Windows 7 — apparently good, according to Mark Shuttleworth (just do a search for “shuttleworth windows 7”). That’s your solution, because the things you want (need?) is not the open source world’s problems, it’s the closed source world’s problem, i.e., Microsoft’s problem. But then they don’t see it as a problem, and why should they? GNU/Linux desktops has a mere 1% share as you pointed out.

    You want Shuttleworth to do these things for you, do you require the same from Steve Jobs? No, because MS actually makes _their_ software run on OS X. The real question is, why can’t they do the same for Linux users? Probably that 1% share thing, hey?

    Well, you’ve confused me, I don’t know what you’re *real* problem is. I do know this, you want your bread buttered on both sides… That’s it for me, I going to have some tea and toast now, with jam, and butter.

  14. Wogan
    February 23rd, 2009 @ 7:55 pm

    @wh Tea and toast? Pfft, Steers all the way, baby :)

  15. wh
    February 24th, 2009 @ 9:22 am

    @Wogan Ja boet, that’s where we differ, I make my own food and software, you buy yours :-)

  16. Wogan
    February 24th, 2009 @ 12:32 pm

    @wh hahaha! I make the money to buy the food 😉

  17. Marco Valente
    February 24th, 2009 @ 2:18 pm

    Ha you the bread winner! lol I have been following these comments via email, and I must admit the have been extremely amusing lol! I think we should all agree to disagree. I for one support the Linux cause but I think everyone is entitled to their own opinion and preference and shouldn’t be shot down for it.

    Yes windows sucks for me, for someone else, it might be exactly what fills their needs. Diversity is what inspires the noble developers to push forward and break boundaries!

  18. Tectonic » Ubuntu Jaunty alpha 5 goes live
    February 27th, 2009 @ 9:40 am

    […] chief Mark Shuttleworth has said that users can expect to see a number of interface changes in the coming two releases of Ubuntu Linux – 9.04 and 9.10 – and some of these changes are starting […]

  19. Shinu
    February 27th, 2009 @ 3:51 pm

    Seems like someone here got brainwashed by MS. Why would you waste your time exposing your ignorance? Your amusing. You do not understand the basic principles of open-source software. You are part of the MS bandwagon and no one cares about that. Flame-baiters can’t get enough of the flaming they receive. And my generalizations are better than yours.

    “Do all of that for me, Shuttleworth, and I’ll gladly dump Vista.”
    You still got your Vista? You ARE joking, right?

  20. wh
    February 27th, 2009 @ 4:47 pm

    The whole flame bait and Wogan’s preference for spending money on fast food got me thinking…

    “The `Steers’ name evolved over the years from a variety of names, starting with Golden Spur, then Seven Steer, followed by Branded Steer and Longhorn Steer.” — http://www.superbrands.com/za/pdfs/STEERS.pdf

    Right, so `Longhorn’ was a code name for some version of Windows. Also, now there’s Windows 7 (Seven).

    Then, Steer’s slogans over the years:
    * Real food made real good
    * Flame grilled, it just tastes better
    * It’s that Good (Present)

    There’s that flame again. Hmmm, what’s going on here?

    Now, let’s hope that when Ubuntu’s `S’ version comes out in a few years, they don’t name it Serendipity Steer… “Serendipity is the effect by which one accidentally discovers something fortunate…” — Wikipedia.

    Well, maybe we discovered something unfortunate here.

  21. wh
    February 28th, 2009 @ 11:41 am

    Oh yes, on the Wikipedia page for the word serendipity, there’s a picture of a Heron… Hard(y) to believe, but go have a look.

    WAY off topic, I know.

  22. Wogan
    February 28th, 2009 @ 7:17 pm

    Did anyone see The Day the Earth Stood Still (2008)? Titanic plug for Microsoft.

    Ok, so in summary, it seems to come down to the following two arguments: 1. Ubuntu is better because it’s free, and 2. I have no idea what I’m talking about.

    I’m cool with #2, since I doubt any of you know me well enough to make that judgement, and therefore it’s about as meaningless as the cyberspace its etched on.

    But here’s the thing that’s bugging me. Ubuntu has followed somewhat of a solitary curve in development – I mean, it’s uniquely Ubuntu, it’s backed by one major corporate concern, and that’s fine.

    It’s also attempting to be a better operating system than Microsoft in most respects, offering things that aren’t available to MS users – things like DRMless media, freedom of software choice, and so on.

    But what it’s not offering are the things MS users are used to, and that’s the point I’ve been trying to make in this whole thread.

    Personally, I want to see MS off the desktop OS scene. They’ve got much more important work to do with their lesser-known R&D projects (anyone seen Surface?), and computing worldwide has reached a point where it’s stupidity to expect one company to provide an OS the whole world can use.

    There’s just one catch – everyone’s been using MS so long, they’re used to it, and put up with inane things just because they don’t see an easier alternative. They’ll happily pay for Office and Norton and so on, because it presents a zero-degree learning curve.

    In order to eat into MS’s marketshare, you have to provide two things. First, an OS that’s equal to Windows in every way, making it a zero-degree transition curve. Unfortunately, since the platforms are so radically different, that’s a bit of a problem right now, but it can be solved.

    The second thing you have to provide is a set of solid features that beat what MS is offering. And not just “beat” because it’s different, “beat” because it’s a genuinely better system. Repeat after me: Different is NOT better!.

    Ubuntu has the mother of all shots at this – Cloud computing. MS is still milking the desktop cash cow, Google’s focused on web-based cloud apps, which leaves a potentially major niche exposed, and I bet Canonical/Shuttleworth is the only concern with the resources to take it on.

    So then, why haven’t they? Cloud computing and online services of that sort have been around for at least the last 5 years, but it’s only now that we’re beginning to glimpse an OS that takes advantage of that?

    I suppose that’s reason #1 I’m pissè at Ubuntu. Instead of actively engaging a saturated market, it’s basically just been boiling in its own stew. That’s why you have such a minority marketshare, and that’s something that (believe it or not), I’d like to see change.

  23. Supportive
    March 4th, 2009 @ 9:24 am

    Linus is NOT Windows.
    http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

    Thank goodness for THAT!!!

  24. Rusty
    March 4th, 2009 @ 10:23 am

    Fantastic. I’m sick of Ubuntu brown and orange -.-

  25. David Robert Lewis
    March 7th, 2009 @ 12:10 pm

    Here are 7 reasons why adopting Ubuntu is a no-brainer in the South African context.

    1. Ubuntu is the only chance we have of World Domination

    2. Ubuntu will benefit South Africans in ways that Windows and Apple cannot.

    3. Ubuntu will provide more jobs and work in the developing world

    4. Ubuntu will become the standard in Education

    5. Ubuntu is the basic metaphor and ideology of the Rainbow Nation

    6. Ubuntu is the future

    7. Ubuntu makes Linux and FOSS palatable for the masses.

  26. Michael "I don't mind brown" Howell
    April 20th, 2009 @ 3:40 am

    The “finally, no more brown!” stuff is really stupid. I personally never really minded brown, and think that it is _definitely_ the best idea Canonical could use, because it creates fast and unmistakable brand recognition without having to write “Ubuntu” on the wallpaper. I can tell if someone is using a (stock) Ubuntu without any trouble at all.

  27. michael
    April 22nd, 2009 @ 12:39 pm

    @Wogan: Sounds like its a clone of Windows you are looking for, try React OS.

  28. HyRax
    April 28th, 2009 @ 2:47 pm

    @Wogan:
    Geez dude, you want Ubuntu to be everything that Windows is… so why don’t you just stick with Windows then?

    People seem to forget that Linux is not Windows! It never will be! The Linux world is under no obligation to provide you the ability to run Windows-native programs under Linux! You should be badgering the manufacturers of that software to introduce Linux versions!

  29. tomm
    May 10th, 2009 @ 1:28 pm

    linux is not windows, why wont my ford take honda parts?

    If want a ms system with all the ms programs use windows, Its common sense. I like jam so I eat jam I don’t eat marmalade and expect it to be the same. Dr pepper tastes different to coke. Linux is Linux and people should use it because of linux’s strengths and use windows for window’s strengths . Its not a war to make a dominant os, its about choice if you like macs, go and use a mac , etc. We dont have ONE food and ONE drink and ONE colour or ONE plant there’s a choice

  30. Ubuntu Linux Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi Driver Installation How To :: eXtra inQuiry
    May 21st, 2009 @ 7:27 pm

    […] There is a way to get your Creative X-Fi Card working in Ubuntu Linux using the propietary drivers provided by Creative as of 2008/2009. As of Ubuntu 8.10 and 9.04 they work fine; however, they do take a little bit of know-how to install. Soon there will be no need for any of this as the ALSA team and kernel team are working hard on integrating them into the Linux system. Watch out for this in Karmic Koala! […]

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