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African users reluctant to give up Internet Explorer 6

By   |  June 2, 2010

European and US Web developers may well be cheering the apparent death throes of Microsoft’s Internet Internet Explorer 6 browser, but African users are more reluctant to give it up.

According to Web analytics company StatCounter, Internet Explorer 6 has slipped to an all-time low, with less than 5% market share in Europe and the US. Worldwide, however, the much-hated-by-Web-developers IE6 browser holds 10.43% market share.

Someone is clearly proping IE6 up. It’s not South America which has an IE market share of 7.83%, but it is African and Asian users.

Among African users IE6 has a 21.85% market share, making it the most popular browser in Africa by a small margin. IE8 has a 21.76% share.

Africa is not as perplexing as Asia, however, where not only is IE6 the most popular browser (21.47% versus 21.33% for IE8) but it also increased its market share between May and June this year, regaining the lead from IE8.

StatCounter data was based on 15 billion page views, 3.8 billion of those from the US and 4.3 billion from Europe.

Comments

2 Responses to “African users reluctant to give up Internet Explorer 6”

  1. Jason Norwood-Young
    June 3rd, 2010 @ 6:05 am

    20.95% of IE users over the last 30 days used IE6 when accessing the Mail & Guardian – about 12% of all traffic. Frightening that we still have to support it nine years on.

    More startling is that we still see hits from IE5.

    Overall trends seem to indicate a slow slide of market share for IE on our site, with it loosing ground to Chrome and Safari, while Firefox stays pretty constant.

  2. Marco
    June 4th, 2010 @ 3:34 pm

    It’s indeed a painfully slow demise of IE6 here in South Africa. As Jason said above, its frighting (and a massive inconvenience) that us web developers still have to take IE6’s non standard compliant rendering into account, a piece of software just about a decade old which translates to millennia in terms of technological development is still among us, which is ridiculous! Not only for web standards but also for online security as IE 6 is the king on exploitable security holes.

    I think perhaps its large market share here in Africa could translate to the lack of knowledge or ignorance to anything not Microsoft. As generally the average computer user in my experience has no idea that there are alternatives such as Chrome and Firefox.

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