German city switches to Linux, saves money

By   |  December 18, 2002

German city Schwäbisch Hall plans to build its entire IT infrastructure entirely on SuSE Linux running on IBM servers and a selection of PCs. The installation will replace a current Windows setup.

The city, of 36 000 residents, will deploy Linux on approximately 400 PCs saving the city an estimated one hundred thousand Euros over the Windows installation, according to a SuSE press release.

“My decision for Linux is based on three factors,” says Hermann-Josef Pelgrim, Mayor of Schwäbisch Hall, “First, I expect a considerable reduction of our IT expenses due to lower software license

fees. This will contribute to the consolidation of our municipal budget. Second, based on Linux’s excellent grades from the experts on security, our IT structure will become more secure. Third, the choice of open standards ensures interoperability among different technical offerings.”

“Schwäbisch Hall’s decision reflects the strongly growing acceptance of Linux in enterprises and governments around the world,” says Boris Nalbach, chief technical officer at SuSE Linux. “With

the lower software licensing fees – as well as the lower administrative costs associated with Linux, the town will be able to provide the most cost effective civil services to its citizens.”

Initially, the project includes the migration from Windows and Microsoft Office to the SuSE Linux Enterprise Client and OpenOffice.org for 120 client PCs, which will increase up to

400 client PCs in the final stage. On the server side, SuSE Linux Enterprise Server will be deployed on IBM’s eServer xSeries systems.

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