HP South Africa confirms Linux laptop plans

By   |  March 30, 2006

HP South Africa has confirmed the release of it’s Linspire-based notebook range. Since Tectonic first reported on HP’s plans for a Linux-based notebook range in February, we can confirm that Tom Hoyt, Insternational sales manager of Linspire, has been in South Africa meeting with local businesses, including HP, and is very enthusiastic about the opportunties to establish Linspire in South Africa.

The HP NX 6110 notebooks will run the Linspire OS and will retail for R5999-00.

In September 2005 HP announced its intentions to launch Linux-based notebooks into the South African market, at which time no decisions had been made regarding the choice of which Linux distribution to use.

According to HP’s Sean Owen-Jones, initial discussions suggested the Ubuntu operating system, but after much experimentation HP settled on the Linspire operating system, with its performance, features and support offering being a key differentiator.

“Of the many versions of Linux available we found Linspire amongst the most simple to use,” says Owen-Jones. “We were also attracted by the extensive software management tools, such as the Linspire ‘click ‘n run’ software management suite.”

He continues, “Linspire includes paid-for third party licenses for applications such as mp3, Java, Flash, Quick Time, Windows Media, Bitstream fonts, Real media, music, and so on. Take all that away and you’re left with something more like the other Linux flavours.”

Jason McMillan from HP’s distributor, Tarsus, says the Linspire machines are not being sold through retail channels but rather through selected resellers. “This is a new market for us and it will be a learning curve for the channel,” says McMillan. “We aren’t distributing the machines through the retail channel because very often the sales staff in retail don’t have the skills or experience required to sell and support a new product like this.”

“This introduction of Linux based solutions forms part of the entry level offering and we will be introducing enterprise Linux solutions for corporate and more demanding users in the near future,” says Owen-Jones.

Support for the Linspire machines will be available online through the Linspire support channels as well as locally through an optional support service. Local support services will be provided by Yellow Penguin.

Comments

4 Responses to “HP South Africa confirms Linux laptop plans”

  1. Tony
    March 31st, 2006 @ 12:00 am

    He continues, \”Linspire includes paid-for third party licenses for applications such as mp3, Java, Flash, Quick Time, Windows Media, Bitstream fonts, Real media, music, and so on. Take all that away and you\’re left with something more like the other Linux flavours.

    I think that is unfair and misleading comment.It is also a stupid comment which shows you don\’t even know how other OSes work

    I am using mandriva, and have all of the above. Cost me nothing.

  2. Wayne Cilliers
    March 31st, 2006 @ 12:00 am

    If you are referring to ease of use and stability for the windows convert you should be looking at PCLINUXOS.

    It come with multimedia support out of the box and a 4500+ file software repository. Add-on application easliy installed with synaptic also a great user forum.

    Try for yourself. All for free on a live CD. Does not touch your current install.

    Cheers,

    Wayne

  3. Nico de Wet
    April 26th, 2006 @ 12:00 am

    Its pretty hard to find these selected resellers. Thought I could get such information from the Tarsus website but no luck.

    Speak to the guys at Yellow Penguin (www.yellowpenguin.co.za) who will be able to give you a lot more details – Ed

  4. Koos
    August 27th, 2007 @ 12:00 am

    Great idea to have Linux on desktops/laptops. As a linux sysadmin who have worked with both windows and Linux, it makes no sense to switch everything to windows, as in the case with my company – for political reasons? I know parliament decided on linux for all government institutions. Are semi state institutions bound by the decision? Not sure.

    But there are other linux OS\’s than Linspire. For our servers, we use Redhat Enterprise, as we get a campus license at huge discount. If it were not for that, we would have used Centos which is very close to enterprise, and free. (This is also a pre-requisite for the high performance computing clusters we are running.)

    For dektop/laptop we use Fedora7 which is great, and so called \’bleeding edge\’ linux – i.e. the latest.
    But linux is not for games – there are thousands of games for windows, which the kids love. They don\’t care to hit the reset once pc gets slow or hangs – games are not mission critical.

    I honestly do not know all the linux OS\’s – there may be a few good ones out there, but if it\’s not for free, why use Linux anyway?
    At the rate which Linux is growing, there is a good chance that this will be the only OS in 10 years time.
    The only reason I\’m still using windows, is that it\’s been forced upon us – outlook for my email – I\’m still trying to find a way around this. (maybe fetchmail and thunderbird?)

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